The Cold Millions

The Cold Millions by Jess Walter

When young Rye Dolan finds himself inside the private library of the mining kingpin Lem Brand, he’s initially impressed by the twenty-foot-high bookcases and the onyx fireplace – but then he is ‘flushed with sadness’. Every injustice and tragedy that has touched him in his nearly 17 years of living comes back to him, and he grieves for ‘All people, except this rich cream, living and scraping and fighting and dying, and for what, nothing, the cold millions with no chance in this world.’ Such is the gulf between America’s rich and poor in 1910.

It’s moment that cements Rye’s solidarity with the working class, even as he becomes implicated in a conspiracy to weed out certain firebrands and crush the movement for workers’ rights altogether. Rye has already been involved in labour rioting in Spokane, Washington, but mostly just tagging along with his older brother Gig, an idealist who, when he’s not joining protests or carousing in the city’s tenderloin, has his nose in War and Peace (although he only owns volumes 1 and 3).

The one who sharpens Rye’s politics and pulls him into a wider world is not Gig or Tolstoy, but Elizabeth Gurley Flynn – a real historical figure amongst Jess Walter’s great cast of invented characters. Flynn, 19 years old and pregnant but already a veteran when we meet her, was an important activist who focused the labour movement and got vilified by the anti-union press as the ‘she-dog of anarchy’. Walter’s other characters could pale in comparison to the notorious, charismatic Flynn, but he musters some marvellous creations. These include Del Devereux, a murderous, over-the-hill private detective whose every utterance is beyond hard-boiled, but who somehow skirts all the usual clichés.

Walter sustains a balance of finely-plotted fiction and illuminating history throughout. Taft, a lawless boomtown on the mountainous Montana-Idaho border, is a fascinating footnote in the story of the American frontier, and Walter doesn’t need to exaggerate anything to make it so. What happens to Rye and Flynn there, somewhere in the middle of the novel, is surely pure fiction, but it fits perfectly.

One of my favourite new novels in some time, The Cold Millions an earnest celebration of a fierce fight for dignity made over a century ago, but compelling, unusual thriller too.

Mr Wilder & Me

Mr Wilder & Me by Jonathan Coe

Jonathan Coe’s latest is informed by the floundering 70s career of Billy Wilder (the master Austrian-American writer-director who once made Some Like It Hot, The Apartment, Sunset Boulevard and Double Indemnity), when he was struggling to adapt an obscure short story into what would come to be his penultimate picture: Fedora. This tricky time for Wilder is refracted through the fond memories of a Greek composer, Calista, who in her youth became part of the production as it moved around Europe. Calista is Coe’s invention, but many of the moments she witnesses are drawn from real behind-the-scenes anecdotes that elucidate our image of Wilder, a cinematic genius who can admire the new ‘kids with beards’ like Spielberg and Scorsese, but not hope to compete with them. His time seems to be up.

Even though I’ve sought out lots of Wilder films (Stalag 17 and Ace In The Hole are a couple of favourites of mine, beyond the obvious classics) I have yet to see Fedora. This didn’t mar my enjoyment of the book, but it helps to be a cineaste in general. Mr Wilder & Me may lack the assured comic feel of some of Coe’s other recent work like Number 11 and Expo 58, but it has plenty to say about artists who find themselves out of step with the times, about the creative drive…and also about the mushroomy, pungent charm of Brie De Meaux cheese.