Weird Walk

Weird Walk is a zine celebrating the landscape and lore of Britain, and particularly the powerful urge to ramble all over these isles and ruminate on our folk history. Each issue has a wild array of thoughtful pieces by different writers, covering everything from ancient dolmens to dungeon synth inspired by 16-bit RPGs, from long-distance Morris dancer/’weird walking pioneer’ William Kempe to the modern art of trespass.

Recent issues have resulted in me seeking out Zakia Sewell’s radio documentary My Albion, Andrew Michael Hurley’s third novel Starve Acre, and The Garden of Jane Delawney, a classic acid folk LP by Trees. I’ve also enjoyed the electronically textured folk music of Vanishing Faces, whose Joanna Walker wrote a brilliant page about the Uffington White Horse, a huge pagan landmark chalked onto a Wiltshire hill that I know very well.

Number Four features Stewart Lee’s visit to Lamorna, a Cornish cove with several magick prehistoric sites and an incredible outpouring of visionary art — yet more stuff to look up, more fascinating rabbit holes to tumble down.

WW’s design is as handsome as its contents are fascinating. Each issue is anchored to a single bold colour and a handful of extremely vibey fonts, then sprinkled with well-chosen woodcuts, engravings and maps, plus freaky distorted landscape photographs — most of which could be unwelcome visions in some folk horror film. This aesthetic all ties into WW’s remit very nicely, and in general this visual flair is far beyond what I’d generally expect of a zine.

Looking forward to more, whenever that may be.